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Archive for November 20th, 2009


New York Mets – Anatomy of a Franchise: Part 4, Was 1969 A Fluke? 2

Posted on November 20, 2009 by Richard Marsh
After their miracle season in 1969, the Mets remained a contender for the next five years.

After their miracle season in 1969, the Mets remained a contender for the next five years.

Bob Scheffing was promoted to the Mets General Manager after the untimely death of Johnny Murphy in January 1970. The Mets had just come off their “Miracle” season of 1969 with their first Playoff, World Series and Championship in its brief seven-year history.

The two sided answer to the question, was 1969 a fluke? That would be answered in the next coming months as the Mets prepared for yet another Spring Training in St. Petersburg Florida where they shared the training facilities with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bob Scheffing came to the Mets organization after a career as a player with a little over 500 games with the Cubs, Reds, and Cardinals. A rather pedestrian .263 career lifetime average set no fires blazing in that realm. He managed both the Cubs and the Tigers, did a little broadcasting and some scouting before becoming the Mets GM.

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Novak Djokovic: Time For The Surge 0

Posted on November 20, 2009 by JA Allen

Novak Djokovic will need to throw out his recent disappointments if he wants to move to the top of the tennis world in 2010.

Novak Djokovic will need to toss away his recent disappointments if he wants to move to the top of the tennis world in 2010.

2007

Remember two years ago at the U.S. Open?  Remember how happy Novak Djokovic was and how happy he made the New York crowds with his impersonations of Maria Sharapova, Andy Roddick, Roger Federer, and even Rafael Nadal?

While the guys growled, seemingly a little scratchy about his antics, Sharapova loved it and even sat in the Serb’s box with his parents!  Life was good then, Nole.  Wasn’t it?

Djokovic made it all the way to the finals of the 2007 U.S. Open, where he faced Federer down.  The Serb lost, of course.  Nerves.  Actually, he lost in straight sets to Federer, but the match was closer than it looked on paper.  That’s what everybody said, anyway.

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Happy to Donate My Space to “A Little Bit About Sternaman” 3

Posted on November 20, 2009 by Todd Civin
Gregg Sternaman being hugged by one of his Lakeville players

Gregg Sternaman being hugged by one of his Highland Park football players

Through my promoting of the award winning children’s story, A Glove of Their Own, I have been introduced to some tremendous human beings and some absolutely incredible causes.

Coach Bob Salomon, the coach of A Glove of Their Own has a heart the size of New Jersey and tries to help every first class human being and every worthwhile cause he can through the Pay It Forward message of the book.

As the unofficial media department for Bob and his book, I am often introduced to the many friends from the sports world that Bob makes and often try to promote their cause through the gift of writing that I’ve been blessed with.

Earlier this week, Bob introduced me to a new friend, Gary Bennett, a former major League catcher for 13 seasons with the Phillies, and six other clubs. Bennett, whose heart is equal in size to Salomon’s, has immersed himself in the Sternyway Foundation, a registered non-profit 501(c)(3) application pending organization whose principle purpose is to provide need based funding for children to support their participation in school and/or community sponsored athletic programs. Read the rest of this entry →

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Rocky Colavito: Super Slugger
      March 30, 2020 | 7:24 pm
      Rocky Colavito

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was just the fifth player in Major League Baseball history to have 11 straight seasons with 20 or more home runs, yet could not sustain that greatness long enough to earn a spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

      In some sense, the legend of Rocco “Rocky” Colavito Jr. began long before he ever started pounding home runs at the major league level.

      Born and raised as a New York Yankees fan in The Bronx, Colavito was playing semipro baseball before he was a teenager and dropped out of high school at 16 after his sophomore year to pursue a professional career. The major league rule at the time said a player could not sign with a pro team until his high school class graduated, but after sitting out for one year, Colavito was allowed to sign at age 17.

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