Analysis. History. Perspective.

Sports Then and Now


Archive for the ‘Sports Medicine’


How to Avoid Common Golf Injuries 0

Posted on August 18, 2018 by Joe Fleming

golf-picture-1At first glance, golf might seem like a fairly safe sport with low injury risk. In reality, though, golfers’ bodies can take quite a beating. This is especially true for professional golfers like Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk, both of whom have had to take breaks from their careers to let serious injuries heal.

Golf injuries are definitely possible, but they’re not inevitable. By taking the proper precautions, you can keep injuries at bay and continue to keep the sport as a regular part of your life.

Read on to learn about some of the most common golf injuries, as well as what you can do to prevent them.

Common Golf Injuries

Some of the most common golf injuries that you should take extra care to avoid include:

Golfer’s Elbow

Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is one of the most common injuries a golfer can experience.

This injury is characterized by inflamed elbow tendons, as well as pain, swelling, and tenderness on the inside portion of the elbow. Golfer’s elbow is most often the result of overuse (i.e., repeating the same motion over and over again without enough rest). Read the rest of this entry →

Preventing Sports Injuries and Treating Them When They Do Occur 0

Posted on August 02, 2018 by Ashley Andrews

sports injurySports provide numerous benefits, from teamwork to dedication to improving fitness. They can also, however, be dangerous. It is important to understand how to protect yourself from the dangers of sports and how to prevent injuries. If injuries do occur, knowing how best to treat them is the key to a quick recovery.

Knee Injuries

Most sports can cause a knee injury if people aren’t careful. Stretching is one of the best ways to prevent this type of injury. Perform a quad stretch by grabbing your ankle and pull your leg behind your body. This will stretch out your knees and quadriceps. A simple toe touch will suffice as well.

An ACL injury is one of the most common injuries, often happening during games like soccer and football where legwork is important. A knee replacement surgery may the final option if rehabilitation and pain medication do not work. Look at total knee replacement pictures and you’ll see the difference between a knee that needs replacement and one that has been replaced. Read the rest of this entry →

The Best and Worst Things an Athlete Can Do to Recover from Patellar Tendonitis 0

Posted on August 01, 2018 by Joe Fleming

patellar-tendonitisTendonitis of the knee (also known as patellar tendonitis or “jumper’s knee”) is a highly common injury among athletes.

Several well-known professionals — including third baseman Brandon Inge, pitcher Oliver Perez, and tennis player Rafael Nadal — have all struggled with chronic cases of patellar tendonitis throughout their careers.

Because tendonitis of the knee is common and comes on gradually, many athletes assume that they don’t need to take their recovery from it as seriously as they would need to take a more acute injury like an ACL tear. In reality, though, chronic tendonitis can be incredibly debilitating and could potentially sideline an athlete completely.

Read on to learn about some of the most common mistakes athletes make when trying to manage their tendonitis and what you should be doing instead.

What is Patellar Tendonitis?

Many athletes suffer from patellar tendonitis without even knowing exactly what it is. Patellar tendonitis occurs when the tendon that connects the tibia (shin bone) and patella (knee cap) becomes irritated and inflamed.

Patellar tendonitis most often results from repetitive knee strain. This repetitive strain creates several small tears in the tendon. Over time, these tears weaken the tendon and cause it to become inflamed.

Some of the most common issues that contribute to patellar tendonitis include:

  • Tight muscles in the lower body

  • Lower body muscle imbalances

  • Misalignment in the feet, ankles, or legs

  • Being overweight or obese

  • Wearing improper shoes

  • Playing on hard or uneven surfaces

Symptoms of patellar tendonitis often come on gradually and usually aren’t noticeable right away. When they do start to notice symptoms, most people report experiencing some pain and tenderness around their kneecap, especially when they’re getting down into or standing up from a squatting position. Some also notice swelling and a burning sensation.

These symptoms are usually sporadic at first and get worse and last longer as the tendon undergoes more stress and damage. Read the rest of this entry →

Everything Football Players Need to Know about Preventing and Treating a Knee Dislocation 0

Posted on July 15, 2018 by Joe Fleming

Palmer-BengalsKnee dislocations are not as common as other sports injuries, but they do still happen, especially in contact sports like football. In fact, football players are probably most susceptible to knee dislocations.

Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Carson Palmer dealt with a knee dislocation in 2006, and Chicago Bears tight end Zach Miller experienced one during the fall of 2017.

If you or someone you love is a football player, it’s imperative that you know how to prevent and treat a knee dislocation. This is a serious injury and the better prepared you are, the greater chance you have of recovering successfully.

What is a Knee Dislocation?

A knee dislocation occurs when the bones that form the knee joint (patella, tibia, and femur, specifically) undergo a great amount of force and are pushed out of place. This is a very painful injury that is always considered emergent.

Symptoms of a Knee Dislocation

The most common signs of a dislocated knee include:

  • A loud popping sound

  • Severe pain

  • Severe bruising and swelling

You will also be able to see that a portion of the knee has been shifted out of place. There’s very little guesswork involved when it comes to diagnosing a knee dislocation. Read the rest of this entry →

The 10 Most Common Boxing Injuries 3

Posted on July 04, 2018 by Joe Fleming

boxingBoxing may be a popular sport, but one must not forget that this still a very aggressive and high impact combative contest. Such intense activities will always come with injuries, hence why you have to base your training on ways to avoid any damaging mishaps. Here are the 10 most common boxing injuries to watch out for.

1. Boxer’s Fracture

The aptly named boxer’s fracture is when the small bones under your ring and pinkie finger break. Said injury is followed by a sharp pain, swelling, and an inability to move your fingers. If your bones are still aligned, then your chances of a full recovery are promising, but any misalignment may require surgery. Avoid this problem by practicing the correct punching technique and ensure your diet is rich in calcium.

2. Carpal Bossing

Common between the ages of 20 and 40, carpal bossing is when the bones in the back of your palm overgrow and cause uncomfortable lumps to surface. Annoyingly, there is not much you can do once this occurs but you can prevent it by using the correct gloves and making use of hand wraps. If the pain becomes unbearable, wear a wrist guard after hours, take anti-inflammatory medication, and speak to your doctor about steroid injections. Thankfully, most people heal quite quickly from carpal bossing, but it will temporarily hinder your training.

3. Arthritis

With is so much repetitive stress focused on one place, the cartridge and joints in a boxer’s hands may deteriorate and swell. This is a progressive condition otherwise known as arthritis and has even forced professional boxers into an early retirement, as was the case for world heavyweight champion James J. Braddock (1935 to 1937). As before, take care of your hands, while exercising additional caution if your routine includes a lot of bag work. Read the rest of this entry →

Avoiding Injury: Simple Steps to Staying Safe in Sports 1

Posted on June 28, 2018 by Dixie Somers

Avoiding Injury - Simple Steps to Staying Safe in SportsWhenever you play a sport or exercise your body, you are increasing your risk for injury no matter how careful you are. However, by following safe steps, knowing your body’s limitations and protecting against the most common types of injuries, you can stay safe and stay in the game. Here are four simple ways that you can avoid stressing any part of your body or landing in the emergency room rather than being on the field.

Always Warm Up and Cool Down

Warm ups and cool downs often seem pointless to new exercisers or players. Most people want to immediately get to the good part, which is the game or exercise itself. However, warm ups and cool downs, which should last for the first five and last five minutes of every game respectively, are vital for protecting muscles and connective tissues from strain and injury. A good warm up will bring blood into the muscles that you plan to use while a cool down should return your heart rate and breathing to normal.

Wear Protective Gear

Protective gear is designed to guard the most danger-prone areas of your body from injury. For example, a helmet is used to protect your head from concussions and other brain injuries. Knee and elbow pads protect your joints that tend to stick out the most from your body. Other good forms of protective gear depending on the sport include mouthguards, shin guards, shoulder pads and eyewear. Read the rest of this entry →

  • Follow Us Online

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Paul Warfield: The Perfect Receiver
      December 10, 2018 | 3:36 pm

      Warfield-DolphinsThe Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was perfection personified as a wide receiver during his NFL career.

      Known for his fluid movement, grace and jumping ability during his 13 year NFL career, Paul Warfield was an eight-time Pro Bowl selection and key performer for the Miami Dolphins during their 17-0 campaign in 1972.

      Because the role of the wide receiver has changed so much and today’s star receivers get the ball thrown to them so many more times than in the pre-1978 era, Warfield is often overlooked when discussing all-time greats.

      But, think about this. Warfield averaged 20.1 yards per catch for his career (427 receptions, 8,565 yards) and 19.9% of his receptions went for touchdowns (85). By comparison, Julio Jones has averaged 15.5 yards per catch for his career and a touchdown in 6.9% of his receptions (46 TDs in 669 catches). Antonio Brown averages 13.4 ypc and a TD in 8.7% (70 of 804) of his receptions. Terrell Owens averaged 14.8 ypc and a TD in 14.2% of his receptions. Even Jerry Rice, considered the greatest receiver of all-time, averaged only 14.8 ypc and a TD in 12.7% of his catches.

      Read more »

    • RSSArchive for Vintage Athlete of the Month »
  • Sign up for Email Updates

    Sign-up to get daily updates of all the great articles and information on Sports Then and Now.

    Enter your email address:

    Delivered by FeedBurner

  • Check out the best free bets at freebets4all. Learn how to convert online bookmakers free bets into guaranteed cash using the matched betting technique.

  • Affordable Satellite TV Great prices on Dish network packages.

  • Gear up for your next trip with new North Face Backpacks from SportsUnlimited.com. Shop great Field Hockey Sticks from Grays & Gryphon.

    Football Jerseys

    8mm film to digital
  • Current Poll

    Will the Los Angeles Lakers Make the NBA Playoffs in 2019?

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...
  • Post Categories



↑ Top