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Earl Morrall: The Perfect Backup 0

Posted on November 16, 2019 by Dean Hybl
Earl Morrall

In a career that started in 1956 and ended in 1976, the Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was never really a leading man, but he seemed to be part of the supporting cast for many huge moments in NFL history.

The second overall pick in the 1956 NFL Draft out of Michigan State, Earl Morrall joined a San Francisco 49ers team that already included the famous “Million Dollar Backfield” of Y.A. Tittle, Hugh McElhenny, Joe Perry and John Henry Johnson.

Morrall started four games during his rookie season, but just before the start of the 1957 season was traded along with guard Mike Sandusky to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for linebacker Marv Matuszak and two first-round draft picks.

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45 Years Ago: The Rumble in the Jungle 1

Posted on October 30, 2019 by Dean Hybl

While the greatest victory of Muhammad Ali’s career was perhaps over the U.S. Government, it could certainly be argued that he had no greater win in the boxing ring than his victory over George Foreman in the Rumble in the Jungle 45 years ago on October 30, 1974.

Though the 32-year old Ali had been a great champion, he had lost more than three years at the peak of his career due to his battle with the U.S. Government and in the three years since his return to the ring had never quite reached the level of greatest displayed earlier in his career.

He had posted a 15-2 record since returning to the ring and avenged both defeats, but the undefeated 25-year old Foreman was 40-0 in his career and wasn’t just winning fights, he was demolishing opponents.

Ali’s two defeats had been to Joe Frazier and Ken Norton. Foreman’s fights with both Frazier and Norton ended in the second round. He knocked Frazier down six times before their fight was finally stopped. Norton, who had famously broken Ali’s jaw in their first fight, was knocked out by Foreman in the second round.

There are many things about the Rumble in the Jungle that are now famously part of boxing lore.

One thing that made the fight notable was that it was being fought in Zaire, Africa. Ali had fought oversees several times previously, but never in Africa.

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Sid Luckman: Chicago Bears Legend 1

Posted on September 28, 2019 by Dean Hybl
Sid Luckman

After years of struggling to find a consistent quarterback, the Chicago Bears now hope third-year player Mitchell Trubisky will be their quarterback for years to come. As the Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month we are recognizing the best quarterback in Chicago Bears history.

Chosen out of Columbia–where he played tailback–with the second pick in the 1939 NFL Draft, Sid Luckman spent 12 seasons as the quarterback for the Bears and led them to five NFL Championship Game appearances and four titles.

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New England Patriots’ Dynasty is NFL’s Greatest 0

Posted on September 16, 2019 by Hammad Basharat

The New England Patriots dynasty is the most successful in NFL history, eclipsing the past feats of the Green Bay Packers, Pittsburgh Steelers, San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys. Since 2000, the franchise have won six Super Bowls, appearing in nine in total in the period.

New England have dominated the AFC East, winning their division 15 out of the 18 seasons following the arrival of Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. The duo have been the source of their imperious hold over the rest of the league, morphing from plucky underdogs in Super Bowl XXXVI to comparisons of the evil empire from the Star Wars movie series. Their reputation and their excellence has seen them backed as a leading contender for Super Bowl LIV, although the Kansas City Chiefs are the favorites in the Betfair betting tips for the 2019 season. New England are perhaps the safest bet for the title given that they have appeared in the AFC Championship game every year since 2011.

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Paul Henderson Scores the Most Famous Goal in Ice Hockey History 1

Posted on August 11, 2019 by Joe Garcia

Every single Canadian who was at least five years old in back in 1972 can tell you exactly where they were on Sept 28th 1972. That’s the day Paul Henderson scored the most dramatic and famous goal in hockey history with just 34 seconds to go in the final contest of the eight-game Summit Series between Canada and the USSR.

The two nations went to to toe with the first four contests being held in Canada and the last four in  the Soviet Union.

Canada stood still that September afternoon with classes canceled across the country while television sets were wheeled into school auditoriums for students to witness the most important hockey game ever.

To many, it was a lot more than just a sporting event. There were many political overtones to the series as it was seen as the capitalist way of life in North America against the Communism of the Eastern Bloc. In 1972 the Olympic Games were purely for amateur athletes which the Soviet hockey players were classified as. Many players on the squad were recruited from the famous Central Red Army while the Canadian team consisted entirely of professional NHL players.

After getting a first glimpse at the Soviets, many who had holes in their socks and sweaters, most Canadians believed their country would have no problem sweeping all eight games. 

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5 of the Most Controversial Moments in the History of MLB 0

Posted on July 26, 2019 by Soniya Basera

America holds the tag of being famous for two of the things, its open hearts for all those who wish to study abroad– particularly in the States and even more for its ever increasing craziness for baseball. However, this sport, like every other sport, has its own sets of controversies, from run-ins with the law to strange behaviors both inside and outside the field. Here’s a list of 5 such controversies that touched the icebergs.

  1. BALCO-BONDS Controversy: Barry Bonds is very allegedly known as a companion of controversies. One of the most prominent and famous of the lot being the BALCO controversy in 2003. BALCO aka Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative was being investigated by the government in 2003 and in the course, Bonds’ name pounced up. One of the finest power-hitting outfielder, Bonds was asked to testify before the grand jury where he declined the usage of any sort of steroids let alone any association with the company. Bonds was however, found to be lying and was later charged with both perjury and obstruction of justice in 2007. Sentencing has yet to happen on the latter charge.
  • ALCS- Game 6 Controversy: An eye flipping game between Kansas City Royals and Toronto Blue Jays called for massive craziness among the audience. It all started with Mike Moustakas of Kansas City Royals. Mike being in the ace of his game, hit off of a magnificent delivery from David Price. The ball hyped straight into the right field and was about to concluded a score when a fan reached over the railing and caught the ball. The over enthusiasm of the fan resulted in lack of clarity on whether the ball would have actually cleared the wall or made a hit on the top- resulting in a whopping ground-rule double. The man on right field, Bautista, signaled for interference, almost instantly. The decision ruled out for a home run and was also confirmed upon review.
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  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Rocky Colavito: Super Slugger
      March 30, 2020 | 7:24 pm
      Rocky Colavito

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was just the fifth player in Major League Baseball history to have 11 straight seasons with 20 or more home runs, yet could not sustain that greatness long enough to earn a spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

      In some sense, the legend of Rocco “Rocky” Colavito Jr. began long before he ever started pounding home runs at the major league level.

      Born and raised as a New York Yankees fan in The Bronx, Colavito was playing semipro baseball before he was a teenager and dropped out of high school at 16 after his sophomore year to pursue a professional career. The major league rule at the time said a player could not sign with a pro team until his high school class graduated, but after sitting out for one year, Colavito was allowed to sign at age 17.

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