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Fantography: Every Baseball Picture Tells A Story, Don’t It? 17

Posted on November 16, 2009 by Todd Civin

Andy Strasberg in 1966 with Roger Maris at The Stadium

Andy Strasberg in 1966 with Roger Maris at The Stadium

As I chatted with Andy Strasberg about his new baseball related venture called Fantography™,  I couldn’t help but hum Rod Stewart’s 1971 anthem, “Every Picture Tells a Story”.

In actuality, however, my musical recap of Strasberg’s photographic venture may be best summarized as Paul Simon’s Kodachrome mixed with a few verses of Take Me Out to The Ball Game.

Fantography™ is Strasberg’s recently unveiled undertaking, whose goal it is to harvest centuries of baseball photographs and the wonderful stories that go along with them. These are the photographs, taken not by professional photographers, but by the fans, themselves.

Strasberg sees Fantography™ as the offspring of his five decade love affair with the sport of baseball, a love affair that is not unique to him, but is shared by fans throughout the globe. The project will allow fans to upload their personal baseball memories onto the Fantography™ website to be stored forever and shared with other fans of the game.

“It’s more than just a box score,” explains Strasberg, the former VP of Marketing for the San Diego Padres. “It’s the love affair between a fan and the game of baseball as seen through the lens of a camera.” Read the rest of this entry →

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

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      Rusty Staub

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month is a former major league baseball player who came into the game as a teenager and stayed until he was in his 40s. In between, Rusty Staub put up a solid career that was primarily spent on expansion or rebuilding teams.

      Originally signed by the Colt .45s at age 17, he made his major league debut as a 19-year old rookie and became only the second player in the modern era to play in more than 150 games as a teenager.

      Though he hit only .224 splitting time between first base and rightfield, Staub did start building a foundation that would turn him into an All-Star by 1967 when he finished fifth in the league with a .333 batting average.

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