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Major Leagues: Which Players had the Worst Injuries in 2014? 5

Posted on October 24, 2014 by Brooke Chaplan
Aroldis Chapman had a tough start to the 2014 season.

Aroldis Chapman had a tough start to the 2014 season.

While baseball isn’t technically a contact sport, injuries are common. Sometimes, serious injuries can have a significant impact on a player’s, or even a team’s season. Here are some of the worst injuries suffered in the 2014 MLB season.

Dan Jennings–Miami Marlins
This injury is, fortunately, not one of the worst because of the damage done. That said, any time someone takes a 101 mile line drive to the head, the event has to qualify for any “worst injuries” list. Jennings, a pitcher, was struck on the head by a line drive off the bat of Jordy Mercer, a shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Jennings was carried off of the field and diagnosed with a concussion.

Aroldis Chapman–Cincinnati Reds
Pitchers often find their way onto the injuries list, and Chapman is no exception. Another pitcher struck by a batted ball, Chapman was struck by an estimated 99 mile per hour line drive while on the mound. Unlike Jennings, Chapman was struck directly in the face instead of on the top of the head. Chapman sustained severe damage to his head and face, and the game was cancelled after the incident.

Carlos Quentin–San Diego Padres
Quentin was off to a slow start for his 2014 campaign. Before he could get back on track and be the impact player for the Padres everyone hoped, he suffered a bone bruise in his left knee. While a bruise might not sound like a major injury, Quentin was placed on the disabled list for the rest of the year. Only time will tell if Quentin recovers and returns to his prior performance levels. Read the rest of this entry →

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Larry “The Zonk” Csonka
      January 29, 2022 | 4:43 pm
      Larry Csonka

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was the leader of a running attack that was the cornerstone of two Super Bowl Championship teams, including the only undefeated squad in NFL history.

      With his distinctive headgear and a body suited for punishing contact, Larry Csonka looked the part of a fullback and for 11 NFL seasons delivered and took regular punishment on his way to the Hall of Fame.

      Following in the great tradition of Jim Brown, Ernie Davis, Jim Nance and Floyd Little, Csonka earned All-American honors at Syracuse while rushing for 2,934 yards.  He began earning a name for himself as the Most Valuable Player of the East–West Shrine Game, the Hula Bowl, and the College All-Star Game.

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