Analysis. History. Perspective.

Sports Then and Now



San Francisco 49ers: All-“No” Team, Skill Positions 20

Posted on October 07, 2009 by Blaine Spence

The 49ers selected Jim Druckenmiller over Jake Plummer in the 1997 NFL Draft.

The 49ers selected Jim Druckenmiller over Jake Plummer in the 1997 NFL Draft.

“There’ll be no parade, no TV or stage…You don’t have to be a star, baby, to be in my show.”

—Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr., 1976

Introduction

During recent months I have read some great articles recounting the San Francisco 49ers glory years. I’ve seen articles describing the author’s favorite 49er team, articles comparing Steve Young to Joe Montana, and articles re-living “The Catch” and “The Stop.” Ah…those were the days!

You won’t find that here.

I have decided to assemble a 49er team based on some of the worst decisions in the last 30 years or so of the team’s history.

So as you’re reading, please keep this in mind. Being bad doesn’t always get you on the team, though it does help. The decision to bring you in, or even to release you, might be the deciding factor for this team.

So, without further ado, and foregoing hours of intense research (I went with the more reliable “cringe factor”), I give you the San Francisco 49ers’ All-“No” Team!

Grab your Maalox and barf bags and get ready to re-live some of the most painful and mind boggling decisions in 49er history.

Read the rest of this entry →

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