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Sports Then and Now



Having A Sports Career After Hanging Up Your Boots 0

Posted on December 19, 2019 by John Harris

They say “do what you love, and you will never work a day in your life.” Well, what if what you love is sports? We can’t all be professional athletes, and perhaps that ship has well and truly sailed for you already. However, those aren’t the only ways to turn your passion for sports into a career. Here are a few other ways you should be aware of.

Start writing for sports

Are you a confident writer or a good speaker? Then sports journalism could be the right step for you. It can involve writing for websites, papers and magazines, radio or TV. If you prefer a more independent route, you can start blogging, though it can take time for monetization opportunities, such as affiliate programs, to start presenting themselves. You can also look into academic writing and getting into the world of sports academia, but that requires a lot more education.

Help develop the athletes

Want to help athletes stick at the top of their game? There are a lot of ways to do it. Coaching is the most obvious, but many coaching positions are voluntary or highly competed for in schools. Personal trainers are highly sought after, helping with the strengthening and condition of top-level athletes. If you can make it through the personal training courses, it can be highly lucrative as you will deal with not only athletes but also clients from all walks of life. Sports instructors and physiotherapists tend to work more closely and exclusively with athletes and may end up getting hired to work full time for certain teams or groups.

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  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Rusty Staub: A Man For All Ages
      April 8, 2024 | 1:26 pm
      Rusty Staub

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month is a former major league baseball player who came into the game as a teenager and stayed until he was in his 40s. In between, Rusty Staub put up a solid career that was primarily spent on expansion or rebuilding teams.

      Originally signed by the Colt .45s at age 17, he made his major league debut as a 19-year old rookie and became only the second player in the modern era to play in more than 150 games as a teenager.

      Though he hit only .224 splitting time between first base and rightfield, Staub did start building a foundation that would turn him into an All-Star by 1967 when he finished fifth in the league with a .333 batting average.

      Read more »

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