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5 of the Most Controversial Moments in the History of MLB 0

Posted on July 26, 2019 by Soniya Basera

America holds the tag of being famous for two of the things, its open hearts for all those who wish to study abroad– particularly in the States and even more for its ever increasing craziness for baseball. However, this sport, like every other sport, has its own sets of controversies, from run-ins with the law to strange behaviors both inside and outside the field. Here’s a list of 5 such controversies that touched the icebergs.

  1. BALCO-BONDS Controversy: Barry Bonds is very allegedly known as a companion of controversies. One of the most prominent and famous of the lot being the BALCO controversy in 2003. BALCO aka Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative was being investigated by the government in 2003 and in the course, Bonds’ name pounced up. One of the finest power-hitting outfielder, Bonds was asked to testify before the grand jury where he declined the usage of any sort of steroids let alone any association with the company. Bonds was however, found to be lying and was later charged with both perjury and obstruction of justice in 2007. Sentencing has yet to happen on the latter charge.
  • ALCS- Game 6 Controversy: An eye flipping game between Kansas City Royals and Toronto Blue Jays called for massive craziness among the audience. It all started with Mike Moustakas of Kansas City Royals. Mike being in the ace of his game, hit off of a magnificent delivery from David Price. The ball hyped straight into the right field and was about to concluded a score when a fan reached over the railing and caught the ball. The over enthusiasm of the fan resulted in lack of clarity on whether the ball would have actually cleared the wall or made a hit on the top- resulting in a whopping ground-rule double. The man on right field, Bautista, signaled for interference, almost instantly. The decision ruled out for a home run and was also confirmed upon review.
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6 Of the Best Football Transfers in History 0

Posted on July 23, 2019 by Samantha Pierrie

Over the decades, clubs have reached deep into their pockets to ensure that they have the world’s best players on their team. Some of these soccer stars have flourished under the pressure of their transfer fee while others have been crushed with the burden of expectations placed on them.

To keep things on a positive note, we’d like to bring 6 key transfers in the history of world football to your attention, that had a tremendous impact on the players career, the fate of a team or even of leagues. With plenty of offers for betting free on who goes where in todays transfer markets,  here we found our picks in no particular order for the best transfer:

1. David Beckham to the L.A. Galaxy

The year: 2007

The transfer fee: $30 Million

The impact: While this move didn’t brand Beckham as the next Pelé like L.A. Galaxy hoped it would, it did bring in a fortune for Galaxy in terms of advertising deals and brought international attention to the MLS. It also sparked the arrival of more international additions. So, while David Beckham didn’t perform as well on the field as fans had hoped, he did make a significant change to the team in other ways.

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80 Years Ago: The Iron Horse Says Goodbye 0

Posted on July 04, 2019 by Dean Hybl

Imagine if one of the most iconic athletes of the current era suddenly retired, announced he had an incurable disease and within two years was dead. That is exactly what happened in 1939 when iconic New York Yankees star Lou Gehrig pulled himself out of the lineup after 2,130 consecutive games and then 80 years ago, on July 4, 1939, said goodbye to New York fans with his famous “luckiest man on the face of the earth” speech.

For 13 years, Gehrig was baseball’s most durable player as he famously was in the lineup every day. But durability wasn’t his only strength, he was also the best first baseman of his generation and was a run-producing machine.

Only Gehrig could push the Sultan of Swat, Babe Ruth, into the number three spot in the batting order. He drove in 140 or more runs nine times during his career, including 185 RBI during the 1931 season. In 1934 he claimed the triple crown as he hit .363 with 49 home runs and 166 RBI.

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Remembering the Topps Candy Lids 1

Posted on April 28, 2019 by Joe Juhasz

1970/1972/1973 Topps Candy Lids
Checklist & Values


1973 Topps Candy Lids Box 1973 Topps Candy Lids Tub Topps has tried many crazy products, often called “test issues”. Test issues were usually only distributed in limited areas and were difficult to find. Candy Lids were one of Topps most unusual; little tubs of candy with player’s photos on bottom of the 1 7/8″ lids. The 10 cent candy’s came 24 to a box. Sealed tubs can still be found in the $150 to $200 range. Called “Baseball Stars Bubble Gum”, the 1970 Topps Candy Lids set had 24 different players, while 1973 Topps Candy Lids had 55.

1970 Topps Candy Lids Front 1970 Topps Candy Lids Back 1972 Topps Candy Lids Ryan Topps released their first Candy Lids in 1970. The 1970 Topps Candy Lids are very, very hard to find and had small photos of Tom Seaver, Carl Yastrzemski and Frank Howard.

In 1973 the candy was replaced by gum, the mini photo of Frank Howard was gone from the top of the lid and team logos were airburshed off the player’s caps. Even the tiny Yaz and Seaver photos logos removed. 1973 Topps Candy Lids are hard to find, but not nearly as scarce as the 1970’s. In 1972 a Topps Candy Lids issue was planned but never released although a few proofs do exist.

1973 Topps Comics Topps released two other test issue sets in 1973 (1973 Topps Pinups and 1973 Topps Comics). The 1973 Topps Comics and 1973 Topps Candy Lids shared many photos and again had no team logos. If thinking “licensing dispute”, you are likely right. Topps received player’s union’s permission for these test issues, but not Major League Baseball’s. Issues over rights & fees with MLBPA and the player’s union resulted in Topps started shutting down future production of test issues putting an end to some of their most fun collectibles.

Click for complete 1973 Topps Candy Lids Checklist and Prices
Note: You may be on that page right now.

Classic Rewind: Reliving the Six Overtime Marathon Between Syracuse and Connecticut in the 2009 Big East Tournament. 0

Posted on March 15, 2019 by Chris Kent

It was one of the most entertaining games in the history of college basketball. The six overtime marathon of a battle between Syracuse and Connecticut in the quarterfinals of the 2009 Big East Tournament was for starters, thrilling. Adjectives are never ending in describing it. Phenomenal. Amazing. Exhausting. Climactic.

Syracuse players celebrate their thrilling six-overtime victory over Connecticut in the quarterfinals of the 2009 Big East Tournament on March 12 and 13.

Filled with the suspense and drama on when, not to mention if, the game would ever end, it was equally as attractive for  being a marquee matchup of two longtime Big East rivals lead by prestigious head coaches in Jim Boeheim of the Orange and Jim Calhoun of the Huskies. The glamour and glitz of New York City added to this game as the school’s dueled on the national stage of Madison Square Garden, known as the world’s most famous arena. Both teams were ranked in the AP Poll with Connecticut at No. 3 and Syracuse at No. 18. The sixth-seeded Orange and the third-seeded Huskies were also meeting for the fourth time in the last five seasons in the Big East Tournament with Syracuse having won the prior three matchups from 2005 through ’07.

In playing the longest ever game in the shot clock era, Syracuse and Connecticut tied for the second longest game in the history of NCAA Division I college basketball. Only two other games have ever gone six overtimes. Both those happened in the 1950’s when Minnesota beat Purdue 59-56 in 1955 and Niagara beat Siena 88-81 in 1953. The game was eclipsed in number of overtimes only by a game on Dec. 21, 1981 when Cincinnati beat Bradley 75-73 in seven overtimes. That game in 1981 tied for the most overtimes in the history of college basketball regardless of NCAA classification.

However overtime almost never happened for the Orange and Huskies.

Connecticut freshman guard Kemba Walker’s offensive rebound and layup with 1.1 seconds left in regulation tied the game at 71. Following a Syracuse timeout, Orange junior guard Eric Devendorf gathered a long inbounds pass off a deflection and quickly got off a 3-point shot that went in giving the Orange an apparent victory. However replays showed that the ball was still contacting Devendorf’s fingertips as the buzzer sounded and the basket was waived off by officials and the game went into overtime.

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William & Mary Reminds Us That College Basketball is Really a Business 0

Posted on March 13, 2019 by Dean Hybl
In 16 seasons as men’s basketball coach at William & Mary, Tony Shaver won more games than were won in the 20 seasons prior to his arrival.

It seems like a day doesn’t go by this time of year without another reminder that college athletics is really a major business that likes to pretend it is something more noble and altruistic.

Full disclosure that today’s example is a bit personal and especially frustrating for me because it involves a former colleague who has spent his entire career representing all the positive attributes that college sports supposedly are about.

After 16 years of success that is unparalleled in the history of William & Mary men’s basketball, the college has decided to part ways with 65-year-old head coach Tony Shaver.

In a statement, Athletic Director Samantha Huge said that “We have high expectations for our men’s basketball program, including participating in the NCAA tournament, and we will not shy away from setting the bar high. Now is the time to begin a new chapter in William & Mary basketball.”

That sounds all well and good, but what Huge seems to not understand is that prior to the arrival of Shaver, “high expectations” for the men’s basketball program basically meant double-digit victories every few years.

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  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Earl Morrall: The Perfect Backup
      November 16, 2019 | 10:46 am
      Earl Morrall

      In a career that started in 1956 and ended in 1976, the Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was never really a leading man, but he seemed to be part of the supporting cast for many huge moments in NFL history.

      The second overall pick in the 1956 NFL Draft out of Michigan State, Earl Morrall joined a San Francisco 49ers team that already included the famous “Million Dollar Backfield” of Y.A. Tittle, Hugh McElhenny, Joe Perry and John Henry Johnson.

      Morrall started four games during his rookie season, but just before the start of the 1957 season was traded along with guard Mike Sandusky to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for linebacker Marv Matuszak and two first-round draft picks.

      Read more »

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