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How Watching Sports With Family and Friends Creates Memories 1

Posted on May 17, 2022 by Ashley Andrews

Participating in sports has been shown to provide significant benefits to the physical and emotional health of those who participate. It is a significant aspect that helps to contribute to our overall health and happiness. On the other hand, some people are just not cut out for sports, and they would rather sit back and watch the action unfold on TV or even watch it on the field.

Being a spectator is, unfortunately, often associated with the lazy. However, watching sports is not something that only the lazy do. People who have a lot on their plates throughout the week working different jobs such as nursing, teaching, building homes, or manufacturing hardware for barn doors, for example, often make time to relax by watching their favorite sporting events during the weekend. 

Watching sports has a favorable effect on your overall health and well-being, but that’s not all. If you watch sports with family and friends, you can create unforgettable memories. This article discusses how watching sports with friends and family creates memories.

Watching sports with family creates a familiar atmosphere

Have you ever gone to your favorite joint to watch a game on your own, and it did not feel as great even if your favorite team won? But when you watch the game with your friends or family, there is a familiar environment; it just feels better with them.

If you support different teams, there is a chance that you will be ridiculing each other throughout the game, which makes the experience even more fun. While watching sports, you get to share a drink or two with friends, making the event even more memorable.

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Elite Eight Battle Between Duke and Kentucky in 1992 was a Classic Thriller 0

Posted on March 24, 2022 by Chris Kent

I

t was a game that epitomized March Madness. The 1992 East Regional Final of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament between Duke and Kentucky was as thrilling a game as one can imagine. Basketball pundits and fans everywhere witnessed a game for the ages. It was an instant classic packed with as much drama as a play on broadway in New York City.

Actually, it was played in Philadelphia, PA at The Spectrum and featured the east region’s top two seeds. On Saturday March 28, 1992, the Blue Devils and the Wildcats battled in a game that is remembered as a theatrical masterpiece. Veteran broadcasters Verne Lundquist and Len Elmore called the game for CBS Sports and did a masterful job. With a trip to The Final Four on the line, the two nationally ranked powers went back-and-forth much of the game leading up to a frantic, thrilling, and dramatic finish.

Having just fallen behind by one point on a Kentucky basket after which they used their final timeout with 2.1 seconds left in overtime, Duke inbounded the ball under the Wildcats’ basket. Sophomore forward Grant Hill prepared to make the long inbounds pass which was nearly the full length of the court. The call by Lundquist sounded like this:

“There’s the pass to Laettner…puts it up…(Buzzer sounds) Yessssssssssss!

Hill’s long inbounds pass was caught by 6-11 senior forward/center Christian Laettner just outside the top of the foul line where he made a turnaround jumper as time expired. Echoes of Lundquist’s call have lingered on for decades since this fabled play.

Christian Laettner makes a turnaround shot to beat the final buzzer lifting Duke over Kentucky in the 1992 East Regional Championship Game of the NCAA Tournament. The win sent the Blue Devils to their fifth straight Final Four. Click on the above photo to watch a replay of this full game, one of the best basketball games ever played.

Ecstasy resulted for the Blue Devils while Kentucky was left in anguish. Laettner’s basket, a swish, lifted Duke to an improbable 104-103 win and sent the Blue Devils to The Final Four for the fifth straight year. Wildcat senior forwards John Pelphrey and Deron Feldhaus, each standing 6-7, defended Laettner on the final play. Pelphrey made a reach for the ball before backing off to avoid fouling for Kentucky. Feldhaus was closer and raised both arms up on Laettner as he took the epic shot.

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Great Sports Moments From the 4th of July 0

Posted on July 04, 2021 by Dean Hybl

It probably comes as no surprise that the 4th of July has seen a few more “special” sports moments than most other days on the calendar. As a national holiday occurring during the height of the season for baseball, there have been a significant number of special baseball moments on this date.

Lou Gehrig became the first MLB player to have his number retired during Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day on July 4, 1939.

Even though July 4th is a day that our friends in England are maybe not as enthusiastic in celebrating, July 4th does have quite a history in that country as many Wimbledon titles have been claimed on that special date.

Over the years the date has also seen special moments in boxing history and women’s golf.

Below is a chronological look at a few of those special July 4th sports moments:

1910 – In what was dubbed the “Fight of the Century”, World Heavyweight Boxing Champion Jack Johnson retains his title with a 15th round TKO against James J. Jeffries.

1911 – Ty Cobb’s pursuit of Willie Keeler’s record hitting streak of 45 consecutive games ends at 40 games when Cobb is held hitless in four attempts by Ed Walsh of the Chicago White Sox. Cobb’s streak remains the sixth longest streak in MLB history.

1914 – Dorothea Chambers claims her seventh, and final, Wimbledon Women’s Singles title, beating Ethel Larcombe 7-5, 6-4.

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Magical Memories from the Masters’ Recent History 0

Posted on November 10, 2020 by John Harris

The Masters holds a special place in the heart of many golf fans. As far as the four major championships go, the Augusta showpiece is the one with the most history, tradition, and memories, making it an event to look forward to for all sport enthusiasts each year.

This year, the Masters will look somewhat different, due to the fact that the tournament is being held in the autumn for the first time. This is because the coronavirus pandemic meant the original spring dates for the Augusta major could not be fulfilled. It will be an interesting spectacle, and already golf fans are eagerly examining the US Masters golf odds to try and pick their winners.

To celebrate the return of the Masters after such a long wait, we’ve compiled a few of the competition’s most magical memories from the last ten years.

2010: Phil Mickelson’s third title

Phil Mickelson, even now at the age of 50, is one of the biggest names in golf, and his rivalry with Tiger Woods over the years kept millions of sports fans on the edge of their seats. In 2010, Mickelson made it a hat-trick of Masters titles, by holding off the challenges of Lee Westwood and Anthony Kim to shoot a bogey-free final round and secure a memorable third win at Augusta.

2013: Adam Scott becomes Australia’s first champion

Three years later, there were celebrations Down Under as Adam Scott became the first Australian to win the Masters. He had to do it the hard way, winning a nail-biting play-off against Argentina’s Ángel Cabrera after both men finished nine-under par. But it was Scott who held his nerve in the end, birdieing the second play-off hole to claim an emotional victory.

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Avoid Sports Withdrawals: Vintage College Basketball Games to Watch on YouTube 2

Posted on March 14, 2020 by Dean Hybl

With March Madness cancelled, the entire sports world on pause and many public gatherings and places across the country and globe closed due to the COVID-19 virus, there are only so many shows on Hulu, Netflix, Disney+ and other streaming channels that we can watch before sports withdrawals are surely to kick in.

Fortunately, YouTube is home to a plethora of vintage sporting events that can help pass the time before live sports return.

In part 1 of a multi-part series, Sports Then and Now has selected 10 vintage conference tournament games that include some of the all-time moments and players in college basketball history. For each one we have included the records, rankings, coaches and notable players at the time of the game, but are not spoiling the game with a summary in case you don’t remember the outcome and want to enjoy the moment without spoilers.

Ray Allen led Connecticut against Georgetown and Allen Iverson in the 1996 Big East Tournament Finals.

The fun part about watching vintage games is that it includes the original announcers, as well as showcasing some players who went on to greatness often before they had become household names, or as they were building their reputation. Players like Patrick Ewing, Ray Allen, Allen Iverson, Ralph Sampson, Tim Duncan, Jerry Stackhouse and many more are included in our selections.

There are certainly other great games to watch on YouTube, but we have chosen these partly because the entire game is available and the game epitomized the excitement of March Madness.

Enjoy!

1983 ACC Tournament Championship Game – Virginia vs. North Carolina State

Records Entering Game: Virginia 27-3; North Carolina State: 19-10

National Ranking: Virginia #2; North Carolina State unranked

Coaches: UVA: Terry Holland; North Carolina State: Jim Valvano

Notable Players: UVA – Ralph Sampson, Othell Wilson, Ricky Stokes, Rick Carlisle; NC State – Thurl Bailey, Sidney Lowe, Lorenzo Charles, Dereck Whittenburg, Terry Gannon

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Three of The Open’s Most Iconic Moments… to Date! 1

Posted on July 08, 2019 by Claire Philbin

If you’re an avid fan and bet on golf, you’ll know that Brooks Koepka and Rory McIlroy are currently joint-favorites to lift the Claret Jug, as the Open Championship is contested later this month, at Royal Portrush. The Open is the oldest of the four golfing majors, having been inaugurated in 1860 and this year marks the 147th edition of the prestigious tournament. With such a rich history, there are undoubtedly hundreds of memorable and iconic moments from over the years. Here, we’ve listed some of our favourites, but do let us know in the comments if there’s anything we’ve missed!

1977: The Duel in the Sun

Golf fans of a certain generation will remember this one as Americans Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus battled it out in the Scottish sun at Turnberry. After the second round, both men had scored 138 (68 + 70) and found themselves T2.

Of course, they were paired together for round three and once again matched each other’s score of 65, to end the round three-under-par and edge away from the chasing pack. The pair played together again on the final day, as they duelled for the coveted Claret Jug. Watson famously said to Nicklaus: “This is what it’s all about, isn’t it?”, with the ‘Golden Bear’ responding: “You bet it is.”

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  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Larry “The Zonk” Csonka
      January 29, 2022 | 4:43 pm
      Larry Csonka

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was the leader of a running attack that was the cornerstone of two Super Bowl Championship teams, including the only undefeated squad in NFL history.

      With his distinctive headgear and a body suited for punishing contact, Larry Csonka looked the part of a fullback and for 11 NFL seasons delivered and took regular punishment on his way to the Hall of Fame.

      Following in the great tradition of Jim Brown, Ernie Davis, Jim Nance and Floyd Little, Csonka earned All-American honors at Syracuse while rushing for 2,934 yards.  He began earning a name for himself as the Most Valuable Player of the East–West Shrine Game, the Hula Bowl, and the College All-Star Game.

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