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Sports Then and Now



3 Olympic Sports You Can Easily Play In Your Free Time 4

Posted on September 14, 2021 by Istvan Liptak

The Summer Olympics ended a while ago, showing the world that, despite the global pandemic, sports still have the power to unite. Aside from the positive message about the power of sports in our lives, the Summer Olympics probably reminded some of us of the other positive effect of sports in our everyday lives: keeping us fitter and healthier in the long run.

Most people only get involved in sports as fans, idly watching them on TV as a distraction while eating snacks and drinking ungodly amounts of sugary drinks or alcohol. But there are sports, even Olympic sports, that don’t require extensive training and peak physical fitness to be performed – they can be played for fun in one’s free time at home.

Badminton

Badminton has been around for ages – for more than a century in its current form. It has become an official sport in the 1930s, and an Olympic discipline at the 1992 edition of the games, and has been contested at the Summer Olympics ever since. China is the most successful badminton nation, with 20 Olympic gold medals and 12 silvers under its belt.

Badminton is not only a sport but also a fun thing to do. Anyone who can lift the otherwise lightweight racket can play it – there’s no need for a court or a net. It’s a surprisingly beneficial sport, helping to reduce health risks of all types, improving mobility, promoting heart health, and representing a total body workout with all the running and jumping it involves. Not to mention the fact that it’s a ton of fun to play – and can be a truly engaging social experience when played in a park or on the beach. Just make sure the weather is not overly windy.

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Six of the Most Frequently Forgotten Sports of the Summer Olympics 1

Posted on April 20, 2016 by Brooke Chaplan

Olympic SailingThe Summer Olympics are always an exciting set of games played by the most elite athletes from all over the world. People from every corner of the globe travel or tune in to see the best compete for the gold. Fan favorites include gymnastics, swimming, and track and field events. However, there are a number of other events that don’t get the attention and support they might deserve. Here are a few of the lesser known, but just as exciting sports to check out in the upcoming year.

Canoe (Slalom/Sprint)
Canoeing entered the Olympic games in the 1936 Berlin games. Before it was often featured as a demonstration event. Athletes compete in canoes carrying one or two passengers. The event is typically 500 meters or 1000 meters. The length has changed over the years, with much longer races occurring in the past. The most recent change is the addition of a 200 meter event in 2009.

Handball
The Summer Olympic Games in Berlin also featured the debut of handball as an event. It was later dropped, then returned in 1972, again in Berlin. Women’s handball was added in 1976.

Water Motorsports
In 1900, water motorsports was featured as a demonstration sport of motorboats. The event was held only once as an actual event in 1908 and featured three races. The course was 40 miles and was hindered by gale force winds and wasn’t competed again. Most motor powered sports haven’t been introduced in the official Olympics, but fans of motocross, snowmobiling, and other sports can enjoy smaller events and competitions that feature worldwide athletes. Places like Bob’s Cycle & Snowmobile Supply stores and other sellers make this sport possible and affordable for more athletes all over.

Sailing
Although a less popular event than swimming, sailing can be an interesting water sport for its biggest fans. Formerly known as yachting, this event can be tricky to maneuver due to harsh weather conditions. It has been around since the Games of the Olympiad held in Greece in 1896 and has been present at every contest minus 1904.
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  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Archie Griffin: 2-Time Heisman Winner
      December 11, 2022 | 1:42 pm
      Archie Griffin

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month is the only football player ever to capture college football’s top individual award twice.

      As a star running back for the Ohio State Buckeyes, Archie Griffin claimed the Heisman Trophy during his junior season in 1974 and then was able to repeat the honor the following season.

      Griffin joined the Buckeyes for the 1972 season, which happened to be the first in which freshmen were eligible to play varsity football, and made an immediate impact. After fumbling in his only carry of his first game, Griffin more than made up for it in his second game by rushing for 237 yards against North Carolina. By the end of the season, Griffin had rushed for 867 yards.

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