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Drone Racing: Everything You Need to Know Before Your UAV Hits the Skies 1

Posted on May 11, 2017 by Katherine Taylor

drone-racing-1Drone racing has become extremely popular as of late, with people increasingly purchasing drones and delving into drone piloting as a hobby, there’s naturally been some competition heating up. Drone racing is now considered a competitive sport, and it’s more complicated than one might think. Here’s a look inside this burgeoning sport.

What Does Drone Racing Entail?

At first glance, you’re more or less expecting drone racing to be a remote control airplane race—and on a very base level, that’s not too far off. But, drone racing is hard to get the hang of. Pilots race their drones at high speeds, through a number of obstacles, controlling the devices as they venture far out of sight.

Obviously, you need to learn how to fly a drone before you can even consider racing the thing, but drone racing requires a real high-level skillset. You’ll need to have perfect control in order to keep equipment safe, as well as avoid obstacles like cars, people, birds and more.

Why Do People Race Drones?

People like racing drones because they offer a more interactive experience than just taking a remote control airplane out in the backyard, cameras, goggles and add-ons all make for challenging, explorative experience that gives users the ability to see into places we don’t have access to due to our human limitations. The racing part of the equation? Well, that’s just human nature—why not turn life into a video game? Read the rest of this entry →

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Rusty Staub: A Man For All Ages
      April 8, 2024 | 1:26 pm
      Rusty Staub

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month is a former major league baseball player who came into the game as a teenager and stayed until he was in his 40s. In between, Rusty Staub put up a solid career that was primarily spent on expansion or rebuilding teams.

      Originally signed by the Colt .45s at age 17, he made his major league debut as a 19-year old rookie and became only the second player in the modern era to play in more than 150 games as a teenager.

      Though he hit only .224 splitting time between first base and rightfield, Staub did start building a foundation that would turn him into an All-Star by 1967 when he finished fifth in the league with a .333 batting average.

      Read more »

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