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Sports Then and Now



Avoid Sports Withdrawals: Vintage College Basketball Games to Watch on YouTube 1

Posted on March 14, 2020 by Dean Hybl

With March Madness cancelled, the entire sports world on pause and many public gatherings and places across the country and globe closed due to the COVID-19 virus, there are only so many shows on Hulu, Netflix, Disney+ and other streaming channels that we can watch before sports withdrawals are surely to kick in.

Fortunately, YouTube is home to a plethora of vintage sporting events that can help pass the time before live sports return.

In part 1 of a multi-part series, Sports Then and Now has selected 10 vintage conference tournament games that include some of the all-time moments and players in college basketball history. For each one we have included the records, rankings, coaches and notable players at the time of the game, but are not spoiling the game with a summary in case you don’t remember the outcome and want to enjoy the moment without spoilers.

Ray Allen led Connecticut against Georgetown and Allen Iverson in the 1996 Big East Tournament Finals.

The fun part about watching vintage games is that it includes the original announcers, as well as showcasing some players who went on to greatness often before they had become household names, or as they were building their reputation. Players like Patrick Ewing, Ray Allen, Allen Iverson, Ralph Sampson, Tim Duncan, Jerry Stackhouse and many more are included in our selections.

There are certainly other great games to watch on YouTube, but we have chosen these partly because the entire game is available and the game epitomized the excitement of March Madness.

Enjoy!

1983 ACC Tournament Championship Game – Virginia vs. North Carolina State

Records Entering Game: Virginia 27-3; North Carolina State: 19-10

National Ranking: Virginia #2; North Carolina State unranked

Coaches: UVA: Terry Holland; North Carolina State: Jim Valvano

Notable Players: UVA – Ralph Sampson, Othell Wilson, Ricky Stokes, Rick Carlisle; NC State – Thurl Bailey, Sidney Lowe, Lorenzo Charles, Dereck Whittenburg, Terry Gannon

Read the rest of this entry →

Bob Cousy: The Houdini of the Hardwood 1

Posted on January 31, 2020 by Dean Hybl
Bob Cousy

As we reach the halfway point of the NBA season, we recognize as the Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month the first in a long line of superstars to play for the Boston Celtics.

Before there was Bill Russell and Larry Bird, the Boston Celtics were powered by a 6-foot-1 inch guard from Holy Cross. Bob Cousy was the on-the-court leader for the Celtics in the era during which they emerged as a basketball power.

Read the rest of this entry →

Lombardi, Wonder Years Star Dan Lauria Talks Sports & A Christmas Story Musical (VIDEO) 2

Posted on November 27, 2013 by Joe Gill

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Dan Lauria

ST&N was lucky enough to sit down with actor Dan Lauria of “Lombardi and “The Wonder Years fame to talk sports and acting. Lauria is currently narrating the musical version of “A Christmas Story”.

We asked him about his latest project, his incredible resume and even his interactions with Patriots head coach Bill Belichick:

ST&N: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Dan Lauria: It was actually when I was in college playing football at Southern Connecticut.  Constance Welch, a respected acting coach at Yale who also taught speech at Southern came up to me one day on campus and asked me if I wanted to be in a play. They needed a big guy to play Caliban in a production of William Shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest.'” It then went from there. Read the rest of this entry →

Ex-Celtics Coach Doc Rivers Made His Mark On Boston Sports History 0

Posted on June 27, 2013 by Dan Flaherty

The Doc Rivers ends and the coach can take his place in the Boston sports pantheon.

The Doc Rivers ends and the coach can take his place in the Boston sports pantheon.

The city of Boston seems to developing a pattern of these coach-for-player trades. Prior to baseball season, it was the Red Sox dealing Mike Aviles to Toronto in exchange for the rights to current manager John Farrell. Now it’s the Celtics on the other end of such a transaction, acquiring a 2015 first-round pick from the Los Angeles Clippers in exchange for head coach Doc Rivers.

The long-rumored trade marks the end of another era of the Celtics and the end of a great ride for Doc in Boston. Now that Rivers’ Celtic tenure is in the books, we can start asking questions about where his place is in the pantheon of Boston sports.

Doc Rivers had coached the Orlando Magic for three full seasons prior to arriving in Boston, and his first year in the Hub more or less mirrored what he’d done in Orlando. Boston had a nice year, going 45-37, but lost in the first round of the playoffs. Doc was in a rut where he’d consistently win 40-plus games, but couldn’t get four more in the postseason and move into the second round.

Over the next two seasons, everyone would have gladly taken Rivers’ previous track record. Though it wasn’t his fault, as the Celtic roster was basically reduced to Paul Pierce and four guys from the local gym league and plummeted first to 33-49 and then bottomed out at 24-58.

Actually the gym league crack isn’t fair, because the organization did have Al Jefferson, who would become the key piece to acquire Kevin Garnett, whom the Minnesota Timberwolves were ready to unload. And though players like Rajon Rondo and Kendrick Perkins weren’t yet ready to be contributors, they were at least under development. But as far as legitimate help for Pierce, there was none until the team added Garnett, and then Ray Allen in the summer of 2007.

Now there were big expectations for Celtics basketball, and Rivers began to come into his own as an NBA coach. The Detroit Pistons were still the most respected team in the Eastern Conference, with a championship in 2004, a Finals trip in 2005 and then successive conference finals’ visits. Cleveland had LeBron James and was on the move. And could these new Celtics’ stars all mesh together?

No one succeeds in the NBA without star players taking the lead, but Rivers excelled at creating the atmosphere where Garnett, Allen and Pierce could first come together themselves and then get everyone else to fall in line. While dramatic improvement could have been achieved by a lot of coaches, not every coach could have racked up 66 wins and immediately made the team look championship-worthy.

Read the rest of this entry →

NHL: See How The Names Are Engraved On The Stanley Cup (VIDEO) 2

Posted on June 07, 2013 by Joe Gill

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There is nothing in sports like the NHL playoffs.  And there is NO trophy in sports like the Stanley Cup.

Lord Stanley’s Cup has been around since 1892, so it’s steeped in history and mystery. Like how are the names engraved on the holy chalice of hockey.


Find out how your favorite player has his name emblazoned on the world’s most famous sports trophy.

Pretty awesome eh?

Sports Then & Now: Touch ‘Em All Baseball Scorebook 0

Posted on June 05, 2013 by Kevin Freiheit

Put away the pencil & scoresheet

Put away the old score sheet

 

Scorekeeping is an art and everybody has their own way of doing it. I’ve created a scorecard that tracks everything you could ask for, making it easy for you to keep track of your team. The scorebook was developed to accommodate a wide variety of baseball statistics, all of which are conveniently placed on one page.

The Touch ‘Em All Baseball Scorebook is for everyone and anyone, and can be used at any level for baseball or softball. The 11 spots in the batting order and room for 11 innings prepares you for innings or games that may go longer than expected. Whether you’re a fan at home watching on television or you’re at a little league game, this scorebook is the one to use.

Features:

  • 11 innings – for games that go longer than planned
  • 11 batting slots – comes in handy when a team goes around the order or if you need more than the usual nine slots
  • 40 lineup cards (one for each scoresheet)
  • Pitching stats – includes a chart for a maximum of eight pitchers per team
  • Hitting stats – allows you to add up and total each batter’s offensive stats
  • Pitch counts – not only track pitches thrown to every batter, but track the pitch count as well
  • Runs by inning – a simple chart that allows you to recall when runs were scored during the game
  • Bench and bullpen slots – list players on the bench and in the bullpen, allowing you to see which players each team has yet to use. As they enter the game, simply cross out their name to stay updated.
  • A box for notes – use it for anything you’d like

Here’s a screenshot of what it looks like:

Screen Shot 2013-06-05 at 12.11.33 PMScreen Shot 2013-06-05 at 12.11.56 PM

 

The scorebook even includes a full schedule page and a roster page with contact information. Of course you don’t have to use everything, but it is there if you need it.

The scorebook also includes instructions for how to keep score, in the event that you are unfamiliar with how it works. There is a page that explains how to do it and shows you examples for those that prefer visuals to learn.

The scorebook contains 40 scoresheets, so you can track 20 games (if you track both teams) or 40 games (if you track one team).

If you are interested in purchasing a scorebook or would like to help fund it, you can do so by clicking here.

 

  • Vintage Athlete of the Month

    • Rocky Colavito: Super Slugger
      March 30, 2020 | 7:24 pm
      Rocky Colavito

      The Sports Then and Now Vintage Athlete of the Month was just the fifth player in Major League Baseball history to have 11 straight seasons with 20 or more home runs, yet could not sustain that greatness long enough to earn a spot in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

      In some sense, the legend of Rocco “Rocky” Colavito Jr. began long before he ever started pounding home runs at the major league level.

      Born and raised as a New York Yankees fan in The Bronx, Colavito was playing semipro baseball before he was a teenager and dropped out of high school at 16 after his sophomore year to pursue a professional career. The major league rule at the time said a player could not sign with a pro team until his high school class graduated, but after sitting out for one year, Colavito was allowed to sign at age 17.

      Read more »

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