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Sports Then and Now



Ten Oldest Stadiums in the United States 0

Posted on December 09, 2017 by Jayson Goetz
Franklin Field

Franklin Field

When most Americans relied on candles to see and washed clothes by hand, the first sports stadium was being laid brick by brick. Now there are more than 200 stadiums in the country, and some come with swimming pools and zip lines. Those interested in original sports stadiums should check out the 10 oldest stadiums still in use today in the United States:

1. Franklin Field

This stadium was built in 1895 for the first running of the track and field competition known as the Penn Relays. It holds the record for many firsts such as the nation’s first scoreboard, the first stadium to have an upper deck of seats and the first to broadcast a football game on the radio and on television. The National Collegiate Athletic Association recognizes Franklin Field as the oldest stadium still operating for football.

2. Harvard Stadium

This stadium was an architectural feat at the time of its construction in 1903. Led by former Civil Engineering professor Louis Johnson, the stadium’s design was the first vertical structure to use reinforced structural concrete. The material was previously only used in horizontal designs such as flooring. Many people were skeptical of the stadium’s design. It was believed that it wouldn’t hold the weight of the crowds or last through the cold New England winters. But the stadium still stands today and it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987. Read the rest of this entry →

5 Fascinating Facts about Modern Sports Stadiums 0

Posted on September 27, 2017 by Dixie Somers

5 Fascinating Facts about Modern Sports StadiumsFew things are as eye-catching as a sports stadium. Enormous, radiant, and all-encompassing, these hulking structures are nothing short of miracles begotten by modern architecture. As one might expect, these Goliaths of entertainment and popular culture have a good number of interesting stories and factoids attached to their construction and histories. Listed below are some of the most striking we could find.

1. AT&T Stadium

Familiar to any fan of American Football, the AT&T Stadium is as recognizable as it is gargantuan. The stadium has a carrying capacity of nearly eighty-thousand, an impressive number by any standard. One of the most thought provoking aspects of the stadium is its simple architectural style. While similar structures pride themselves on complex hallways and building styles, the AT&T Stadium stands out because, in reality, it’s just a room. An unbelievably large room, yes, but a room nonetheless. Additionally, the stadium is a master stroke of electrical design as well. Created by hundreds of talented designers, recipients of electrical engineering master degrees, and other such professionals, the stadium is unrivaled in its design and efficiency.

2. National Aquatic Center (China)

The National Aquatic Center is a world-famous stadium for a number of reasons. For one, it housed the legendary records put in place by the world-renowned Olympian Michael Phelps. For another, it’s an unquestionable architectural marvel. Often called the “Water Cube,” the stadium is a modest size. Size is far from a stadium’s only quality, however, and the National Aquatics Center proves this in its fame. The Stadium has spawned a good number of ‘me-too’ stadiums in its native China, making it the countries most renowned Athletics center by a wide margin. Read the rest of this entry →

How Shared Football Stadiums Prep for Game Day 1

Posted on October 25, 2016 by Daniel Bailey
Oakland Alameda Stadium is currently the only stadium used for both the NFL and Major League Baseball.

Oakland Alameda Stadium is currently the only stadium used for both the NFL and Major League Baseball.

If you’re a big football fan, you most likely already know that several NFL and college teams share the same stadium. If you aren’t aware, there are 13 NFL teams that still share their football stadiums. While the NY Giants and Jets play on the same field, the Oakland Raiders actually share their stadium with the Oakland A’s. This is the only NFL team that still shares a stadium with an MLB baseball team. So how is this possible? The term used when each team is prepping its field for game day is, “flipping the field.”

Flipping a field isn’t an easy task. It takes a lot of time, money and labor to make sure that each stadium is ready before the teams run onto the field. It can take 12 crew members a whole work day to get the field ready for the team’s next game. This isn’t cheap either; it can cost up to $250,000get all of this done.

To lay it all out, Equipsupply created an infographic that goes into the behind-the-scenes details of what it takes to get these football fields ready for each and every game day. So next time you’re prepping for your tailgate festivities, you might think about all the work that it took to get your favorite team’s football field ready for kick off. Read the rest of this entry →

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